Tag Archives: musings

Iceland – a re-cap

How to start when talking about Iceland. The people? the history? the landscape? the towns? So after my 2016 trip I have already posted 4 blogs in chronological order which can be found earlier on this site. But so much remained to be said.

I was, and am still – after 8 months – totally captivated by Iceland…so familiar yet so exotic. At times I felt I had journeyed to Middle Earth; at other times I thought I was observing a very modern society. New suburbs about 10 years old brought a note of the familiar, as did the heavy 5pm traffic flows. We passed satellite towns of smart new developments and ate at restaurants the peer of some of the best in large international cities.

The population is so small and the challenges of nationhood so large, that the country is fascinating. It punches far above its weight on the world stage and just this week voted for compulsory equal pay for men and women.

Since this week Is International women’s day, it is worth mentioning that Iceland was the first country in the world to have a political party formed and led entirely by women Founded in 1983, the Women’s List helped increase the proportion of female parliamentarians by 15%] It disbanded in 1999, merging with the Social Democratic Alliance and left a lasting influence on Iceland’s politics: every major party has a 40% quota for women, and in 2009 nearly a third of members of parliament were female, compared to the global average of 16% for women average of 16%. (from Wiki)

To jog my own memory now and in the future, I have simply cherry picked some facts that stick with me:

LANDSCAPE

  • The country is awesome with volcanic ranges, long fjords, waterfalls, geysers, bog lands, lava fields – some of it beyond description.
  • The volcanic country is rich in geo-thermal activity. Managing this has lead to Icelandic energy experts being sought after around the world and this expertise responsible for a significant contribution to the national income.
  • Iceland has a third of the world’s lava flow with an eruption on the south coast around every 2 years.
  • 24 species of whale swim off the Iceland coast and a polar bear had swum there from Greenland the previous week – only to be shot for his trouble. (In the interests of research and of safety we were told.)

 

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THE CAPITAL

  • About 240,000 of Iceland’s 330,000 citizens live in the capital,Reykjavik.
  • More than 2 million tourists pass through Reykjavik annually, that is more than 6 tourists for every citizen.
  • Parliament Square is the home of the Allthing (the Parliament), a surprisingly small and unpretentious building with a smart extension – surprising until you remember that the population is only 330,000, less than many local authorities/cantons in the western world.
  • Here in 2008 the people gathered to demand action on the financial crisis when the State took over the banks’ debts. In November that year, what is now known as the “pots and pans” revolution happened. People used these cooking tools to generate noise in the square. The police kept the calm. People started dressing in orange to signify peaceful protest.
  • Harpa Hall the concert hall, was being built on the waterfront as a convention centre, hotel etc. by a bank which went bust in 2008. The government bailed them out and this huge cultural centrepiece was completed by the national and city governments. 1.7million visitors a year enjoy this standout building of geometric glass shaped panels. It is a beautiful, imposing building even if perhaps out of scale with the town.
  • Hallgrim’s Church was commissioned in 1937 and took 41 years to complete. It is said to be designed to resemble the basalt lava flows of Iceland’s landscape.
  • There is a settlement museum in town showing where the first houses lay under the foundations of the current town.
  • The National Museum has an artefact which is believed to be of the god Thor, one of the few remaining signs of the pre Christian culture.
  • The pedestrian area is lively as in many sophisticated tourist towns.
  • I enjoyed watching the crowd at one posh restaurant, the Grillmarket, where there was one entrée of 3 sliders filled respectively with puffin, minke whale and lobster. I sat at the bar watching dish after dish of minke whale leaving the kitchen. I enquired of the meat the girl next to me was eating. I was told it was the best horse in town.
  • Wine like most things in Iceland was expensive There were Australian wines: – a Wolf Blass President’s Selection at17,900 IK a bottle ($195) and the familiar old quaffer Jacob’s Creek cab sav for $359 (gulp).
  • Coffee was $5.90 in most places and glass of Spanish wine about $16.

 

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HISTORY

Early history

  • Icelanders have been here for 10,000 years; while Vikings settled the country, Celtic DNA is also present.
  • The Icelandic sagas tell the story of the tribes who settled here as early as 874AD.
  • The first parliament in the world, the Allthing, is said to have begun with the 930AD and then annual, meeting of the 13 Icelandic chiefs in the impressive fields at Laws were read and codified at these gatherings.
  • Christianity arrived in 1000AD and in 1262 the tribal gathering then pledged to Norway’s king. The Allthing was not revived until 1843.

Modern history

Our guide Bjarne (more later) described the recent history of Iceland as the 4 revolutions:

  • Mechanisation. In1902 the first boat with a motor appeared, then the first taller, then the fishing industry was mechanised as were the farms
  • Population explosion. In18990, 13% of people lived in towns larger than 50 people. In 1923, it was 50% and by 2000 only 6% of people lived in rural areas.
  • Energy revolution. Hydro plants were established selling to aluminium companies and the growth of energy knowledge stimulated the export of the expertise.
  • Bank revolution. Around 2000 peopled started to believe Iceland could become an international monetary centre. Government sold the banks to private investors and banks underwrote overseas investments. Local development boomed (some say with the import of eastern european labour including new influences of drugs and criminal elements. By 2008 with the GFC people realised things were wrong and the demonstrations for reform began.

 

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Thought to be the only found idol from the pre-Christian period.

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Along the escapement at Thingvellir where the world’s first democratic parliament met

ECONOMY

  • The economy relies mainly on tourism (30%), fishing (20%), aluminium smelting – enabled by cheap energy (30%) and export of alternate energy expertise.
  • Tourism is seeing a year on year increase of 20%
  • Fish has dropped from 60% of the export economy to 20%. The main fish export is cod but mackerel (which were never seen in Iceland until a few years ago) are now appearing in large numbers.
  • There was a building boom here between 2000 and 2008 preceding and in part generating the Icelandic fallout from the Global Financial Crisis.
  • Now after 9 years, the debts are paid and young people who went abroad are being encouraged to return. There now seems to be more new building happening although the few Icelanders I spoke to were wary, working harder than ever to set themselves up and hoping the cycle was not on repeat.
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Geysers bring tourists and geothermal expertise

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Puffins are a drawcard for the tourists

PEOPLE

  • Settlement is in a number of towns scattered around the coast and many months of the year are spent in constant darkness so like most of Scandinavia and Greenland, inhabitants suffer from the “dark depression”.
  • Between a quarter and a third of Icelandic men are admitted to an alcohol addiction centre during their lifetime.
  • Iceland has more authors per capita than anywhere else in the world
  • the national sport is swimming and recently Iceland has punched far above its weight in soccer.
  • There is a gene in Icelanders that can be found in the Irish and Scottish Celts but the jury is out on whether this came from the women the Vikings stole as wives or whether it is that carried by the Norwegian Vikings it is not known. Suffice to say that there’s a bit of Irish in the Vikings and in the Icelanders.
  • While there are 5 political parties, the recent emergence of the Pirate Party seeking full transparency and open access to government accounted for 40% of the vote, a first in Europe.
  • Whatever the genetic material, I found the people direct and friendly, possibly with a dry humour and certainly they have shown a passion for their politics – all of which sits well with my own Irish background

Our guide Bjarne described the Icelandic character as:

  • Curious about the world because of the island home
  • Hard working , strong and courageous because of the harsh surroundings and the power of natural forces
  • Kind to each other because it is a small society and living is hard
  • Opportunistic, competitive and sometimes greedy (he cited bankers and fishermen
  • Stoic

Our guide personified for me the direct, reserved, dry humoured, knowledgeable, strong person that I began to think was the Icelandic character.

For much of this information I am grateful to Bjarne an impressive man, one time a sculptor then an arts administrator and now a wonderful guide. He had a wonderful face.

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Japan 1 – superficial impressions ….March 2014

Two weeks in Japan with my Cass’ family. My first trip was 33 years ago with two relatively quick visits in between! This is the first of 5 short pieces – I write to trigger memories in distant days.

Getting immediate impressions and things we could learn out of the way first.

  • The public population moves library quietly with admirable self-containment
  • Although superficially the crowd appears internationally homogenous, there is an occasional flash of traditional Japan with girls and women in kimonos paddling along unselfconsciously in the wooden shoes of history and less often, an old man in traditional dress.
She was as lost as we were

She was as lost as we were

Just shopping

Just shopping

 

  • A polite kindness marks all interactions
  • People, even the cutting edge outlandish, or kids from the latest fashion cults dress with care…no trackie daks here and if there were, they would be smart!
  • In contrast, the malls and major centres scream with garish advertising
Hardly soothing

Hardly soothing

  • Underneath the obvious and the elegance there is a uniquely Japanese youth sub-culture – Hello Kitty, manga, anime, dress-ups, style, bars, booze etc. etc
  • There are many layers
  • The kindness of strangers to foreign tourists is repetitive
  • Signs on street, subways, railways, buses are in English as well as Japanese
  • Train and buses have spoken English information repeated after the Japanese
  • Transport is an easy, frequent, seamless series of connection even when mode is changed
  • Much unselfconscious sleeping happens on the trains, even standing.
This senior citizen aaas a ball of style but tired

This senior citizen was a ball of style but tired

  • Generation change is clear when the young do not appear to stand for the elderly on the trains
  • Lines and doors are marked on every rail platform
  • The cleanliness is stunning with neat cleaning squads waiting at every train terminus
  • The toilets with their bidet improved bottom sprays are a joy!
The driving instructions  at the side of the toilet…intensity, temperature of spray? music with that?

The driving instructions at the side of the toilet…intensity, temperature of spray? music with that?

 

These above were the first superficial generalisations. At a deeper level, I was putting down memories with my youngest child and her family. I left with a renewed admiration and love for her – her strength and humour, her mothering and loyalty and in this case, her ability to negotiate the JR and subway systems. Her partner, Stuart’s  quiet calm  and his gentle parenting were admired anew; while these two wondrous grandchildren brought me buckets of joy.

I can do this by myself.

I can do this by myself.

 

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Spain 5 – Musings on a Spanish mountain…… 2011

Two questions:  why do I travel and why on earth would I blog? Some of my cynical mates would say “Who cares?” to both questions. Most of them probably but that’s who I am….reflective in the few free hours that life affords me. Deconstructionism to the point of …….

Travel is not rest – except on lay days like today. It is a race to make sure you don’t miss anything important…  a piece of history, an image, a sense of the present, a good meal. It is to wonder at what went before and to try to learn those lessons; it is to have your senses sharpened by the unfamiliar; to be in awe of the great.

Travel is to stand outside the window looking in with time to absorb what you see. A step off the path of the familiar that makes you think about where you are in all aspects.

Travel starts, for me, a process of brain weaving and questioning. Sometimes a search for lost knowledge that occurs in the greying years. Thank you Mr Google. Sometimes a lateral leap in my Weltanschauung, like, are these kids demonstrating in Madrid right? Are they signalling a new paradigm…is it time for politics as we know them to fade?

So one can travel but why blog about it? Well it beats a travel diary. I never had one of those. Am I just a neophyte, entranced by the technology?  An egoist? Is it just a way to keep in touch which seems so much more important as I get older?

Am I just a dilettante, a grazer at the smorgasbord of life or a would- be Renaissance woman?

Maybe all of those. Perhaps I am just trying to write again, perhaps it is time for that second novel.

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